Tim Grimm, John Statz, Hope Dunbar

Tim Grimm

John Statz

Hope Dunbar

Wednesday · February 6, 2019

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$10.00 - $15.00

This event is 21 and over

Tim Grimm
Tim Grimm
Tim Grimm is a bit of a Rennaisance man in the performing arts world. He has for the past 15 years, blended his love for songwriting, travel, and the storytelling of acting (theatre, film and television). His most recent recording- A STRANGER IN THIS TIME (2017), is a collaboration with his wife, Jan,and sons Connor and Jackson-- the "Family Band". In the Fall of 2016 this same group recorded the single- WOODY'S LANDLORD-- which was the #1 song on Folk Radio for the year. Tim's previous recording, THE TURNING POINT, produced the #1 song on Folk radio in 2014-- KING OF THE FOLKSINGERS. It was a particularly gratifying honor, given the song is a tribute to Tim's friend and musical icon, Ramblin' Jack Elliott. Tim's history with Ramblin' Jack goes back 30 years-- beginning with a bicycle ride that led to The Newport Folk Festival…. Tim contributing liner notes to Jack's Grammy winning album, The South Coast (1995)… Jack's recording Buffalo Skinners with Tim on Tim's album, Coyote's Dream (2003)….and now, most recently KING OF THE FOLKSINGERS.

http://acousticmusicscene.com/2015/01/05/top-albums-songs-artists-of-2014-folkdj-l/

After college (Earlham), Grimm pursed an MFA in Theatre at The University of Michigan and from there worked in Regional Theatre, settling in Chicago. In Chicago, in addition to his theatre work, he studied briefly at the Old Town School of Folk Music and began writing songs and performing. He put together a band, Tim Grimm and The True Hearts and released 2 cds--True Heart, Kind Mind and Broken Down Palace. At which point, "Hollywood called", and Tim put down his guitar and pen, and didn't really pick them up for close to 10 years.
After several years (1990s) working in Los Angeles (where he co-starred for 2 seasons on the NBC drama Reasonable Doubts, worked on Clear and Present Danger with Harrison Ford, and appeared in several films and tv projects), Tim returned home to Indiana. He grew up in the woods and small town settings of southern Indiana, son of schoolteachers and grandson of farmers, and his return home was a conscious choice to live a life of significance rather than one of “success’. He now lives with his wife on 80 acres close to where he grew up. Tim’s songs are full of the rural rumblings that have shaped his life—rich with descriptive details, and sung with warmth and intimacy—recognizing the inextinguishable national romance with the idea of the family farm and the vanishing landscape of rural America. He released the album, HEART LAND in 2000, and on the strength of that recording, was named 2000’s “BEST DISCOVERY in Roots/Americana Music” by The Chicago Sun-Times. His albums COYOTES DREAM and NAMES, led to his being named “2004 MALE ARTIST of The Year” by the Freeform American Roots DJs.
He has released 10 solo albums since 2000 (including the newest- THE TURNING POINT), and 2 collaborations- AMBER WAVES (with Jason Wilber) and WILDERNESS PLOTS.

In 2005, Grimm was asked to compose music and act in a production of THE GRAPES OF WRATH at Indiana Repertory Theatre and Syracuse Stage in New York. His song from the play--THE PEOPLES HIGHWAY, made it onto his next album, THE BACK FIELDS, which was subsequently named Americana Album of the Year by the Just Plain Folks Music Awards-- the world's largest independent music awards.
In 2007, Grimm put together a concept cd with several of the Midwest’s finest songwriter’s— Krista Detor, Carrie Newcomer, Tom Roznowski, and Michael White. The recording, Wilderness Plots, was drawn from the short stories of noted author, Scott Russell Sanders, and explored the settling of the American Wilderness in the Ohio River Valley Region between The Revolutionary War and The Civil War. Two PBS programs have explored Wilderness Plots-- the first, a documentary on the story and song, and the second a full Wilderness Plots- In Concert (2012). Produced by WTIU in Bloomington, IN, both productions were nominated for EMMY AWARDS. Tim continued to write songs based on Sander's writings and released the album, WILDERNESS SONGS AND BAD MAN BALLADS in 2011. Looking ahead to the Spring of 2018, the original cast of Wilderness Plots will reunite for a select few shows, and again be filmed by WTIU for PBS.

Tim has worked with Inishfree Tours for the past several years, bringing Americans (and Dutch and Germans !) to the Emerald Isle for 9 days and nights of music, and day trips exploring 3 select Counties. Guests who have travelled with Tim encouraged him to lead groups elsewhere, and this has led to the annual- Turning Point Tour of The Netherlands, and a Heart Land Tour of Scotland. Tim continues to be active in Regional Theatre as well-- most recently in the Bicentennial production for this home state- FINDING HOME: Indiana at 200, for which he wrote an album's worth of music, and appeared for 6 weeks onstage -- as actor and with the Family Band.
For a list of all available albums (at this time) please visit:
http://www.cdbaby.com/Artist/TimGrimm
John Statz
John Statz
John Statz has been writing love songs lately, specifically about the kinds of romantic love that burn. Namely, all of them. When we first enter a new relationship we are filled with burning desire. Sometimes we later take those same relationships for granted and seemingly burn right through them. At the end we might find ourselves literally burning old love notes, or bridges, which turns out to be an excellent time to listen to that fire in our bellies. Hit the road, see something new, spend time on ourselves. The Fire Sermon is more than a meditation on romance in the 21st century, it is an assertion gleaned from trial by fire.

One of the more prolific and hard-working young songwriters working in the Americana genre, John Statz has released seven studio albums, and performed all over North America (including Canada and Mexico) and Europe, all in just a shade over a decade. Throughout that time he's been writing the kind of songs that float through your mind and stay nestled in your thoughts long after listening (American Songwriter) and it's been said that his songwriting can stand beside the best and above the rest (No Depression). Along the way John has attracted the attention of the likes of Americana scene heroes Jeffrey Foucault and Bo Ramsey (Lucinda Williams, Greg Brown), who separately produced his last two records. This latest is produced by fellow Denver songwriter, Megan Burtt, whose instincts and backing band help bring forth an entirely new sound from Statz. The title of The Fire Sermon was taken from the third section of T.S. Eliot's poem, The Wasteland, the name of which was borrowed from a sermon given by Buddha, in which he denounced the fires of passion, hatred, and infatuation with which the senses burn, according to Eliot's endnotes. At the very end of the Fire Sermon section Eliot simply repeats, “Burning burning burning burning.”

John Statz was given a guitar by his grandmother when he was 15, which turned out to be perfectly timed for a teenager who, after ten years of piano lessons, had lost interest in classical music and had taken to learning John Lennon and Elton John tunes, first trying out his singing voice and turning towards rock and roll. Spending the rest of his high school years in southern Wisconsin attempting to play and sing like Neil Young and Cat Stevens, it wasn't until Statz was 19 and attending university in Oshkosh that he began writing songs. The spark lit after attending a show at the storied Cafe Carpe in Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin featuring Jeffrey Foucault and Peter Mulvey, who quickly became heroes, and, much later on, fast friends and colleagues. The first record, Dusk Came Slow, was engineered by a friend enrolled in the university recording program, and what followed for John has been 11 years of touring everywhere from Bellingham to Budapest, Fairbanks to Mexico City, all the while becoming a stronger songwriter, and a more compelling performer.
Hope Dunbar
Hope Dunbar
Singer-Songwriter Hope Dunbar is a pioneer of the new American prairie style – the incarnation of Americana and Country-Folk sound staking claim under a big sky, shouting at the north wind, digging in and refusing to leave.

It’s early morning in Utica, Nebraska, population 800. The three kids are off at school, her minister husband has begun his day at the church, so Hope Dunbar settles down at her kitchen table to write songs. Behind where she sits, a window opens on what most would consider an empty vista: a dirt road disappearing through fields toward a flat horizon. Hope sees art in the simple and spins tales of limitless possibility, conjures stories of people near and far, living lives inside similar walls, internal and external. Where you’d least expect to find the mystical is where Hope Dunbar’s songs live. And after her morning writing, Dunbar heads out to to begin her shift at a cafe in town. “I write like a sailor knowing the ship is going down. / This is my flare in the night, hoping that one day I might be found.”

“And Hope Dunbar, from little Utica, Nebraska, caught me off guard with some incredible language and truth telling, including the mystical, “We Want.” It’s these kind of surprises in the after-midnight hours when the endorphins of music ecstacy meet the endorphins of fatigue, that make Folk Alliance special.”

– Craig Havighurst, Nashville Journalist and host of Music City Roots

Dunbar’s newest release, Three Black Crows, heralds a strong new voice in the singer-songwriter genre. An unexpected voice of simplicity and authority, honesty and hope. A voice that could not come from anywhere other than the expansive land of her home. She was born in Southern California, but traveled as a young girl, a peripatetic childhood that landed her for six months in Paraguay. Her parents eventually settled in Mission Viejo, California. At university, she met and married her husband and moved with him to a small town in Iowa, where he had been appointed to minister at a Lutheran church. To help her adjust to these surroundings, she started singing folk songs with a new friend, at public libraries, farmer’s markets and fairs. They eventually settled in Utica, Nebraska, an unlikely place for a restless artist, falling in love with the craft of writing, but Hope is a writer with an ability to find truth in overlooked spaces “I really enjoy the empty space,” she says. “There’s no noise where I live in Utica that can get in the way of what my brain wants to write about.”

Dunbar’s songs live on two planes simultaneously. One describes the everyday routines to which we all eventually surrender. The other zooms in on the people who move through their habitual rituals. Her target is the sorrow from which they’ve learned to hide but can never escape, reconciling the two with resignation.

Three Black Crows is a masterful overlay of gentle acoustic textures, emotional turbulence and philosophical insight. Produced by Emily White, with a guest appearance by Darrell Scott, a long-time mentor to Hope, “These songs are based on the people I see every day. In a small town, you get real close to your neighbors. You hear about moms and dads who lost a son you didn’t even know they had because you weren’t there when they died. Their loss will never go away but they’re living with it. They keep going because they have to.

“If anybody needs a song, it’s these people.”
Venue Information:
The Walnut Room - Walnut Street Location
3131 Walnut St.
Denver, CO, 80205
http://www.thewalnutroom.com/